Thursday, August 18, 2016

Future Tenses Revision - A2 / B1 (lower intermediate) Level

Hi everyone, I've already uploaded Future Tenses Revision Table, but it may have been a bit too detailed for the less advanced students. Today I've prepared an easier version - with Be Going To and Present Simple in time clauses. Tell me what you think!

As usual, you can get the printable version by clicking HERE.

PRESENT SIMPLE
PRESENT CONTINUOUS
FUTURE SIMPLE
BE GOING TO
Construction:
The concert starts at 7 :00 PM.
The concert doesn’t start until 7:00 PM.
What time does the concert start?
Construction:
I’m leaving tomorrow.
I’m not leaving tomorrow.
Are you leaving tomorrow?
Construction:
I hope she will get the job.
I hope she won’t get the job!
What do you think; will she get the job?
Construction:
I’m going to move to New York.
I’m not going to move to New York.
Are you going to move to New York?
Usage:
1.Timetables, Schedules, Itineraries.
E.g. The train arrives at 6:20 in the morning.
2. After certain time expressions:
WHEN / AFTER / BEFORE / UNTIL / AS SOON AS
In this case, we usually make a complex sentence with Future Simple and Present Simple after the time expression.
E.g. I’ll call you as soon as I get back home.
E.g. I’ll be happy when I finish this course.
E.g. You won’t know until you try.
Usage:
1.Personal plans for the close future.
E.g. I’m meeting my friends tonight.
2.Almost 100% probability – we have already arranged it.
E.g. I’m flying to London tomorrow. (I have the ticket)
3. We don’t use Present Continuous for fresh decisions. We use it to talk about activities/plans we have decided on before.
E.g. We’re moving to Australia next week. I can’t wait, I’ve been planning it for ages!
Usage:
1.Hopes and predictions.
E.g. I’m sure you will pass this exam! (=prediction)
2. Instant decisions (made at the moment of speaking).
E.g. Wait, I’ll help you with your bags!
3. Polite questions and invitations.
E.g. Shall we dance?
4. We use Future Simple when we talk about far future.
E.g. In 2070 people will live in space.
5. In general, with the verb ‘to be’.
E.g. I can’t see you tomorrow, I’ll be at work.
(in certain cases it’s possible to use the verb ‘to be’ with BE GOING TO)
Usage:
1.It can often be used in the same way as Present Continuous.
E.g. I’m going to stay at home this summer.   OR:
I’m staying at home this summer.
2. BUT we usually use Present Continuous for the events in the near future (tonight/tomorrow) and Be Going To for the events in the further future (next month / next year).
3. ALSO, while Present Continuous is often used to talk about events that have already been arranged, there is no such need while using Be Going To.
4. We use Be Going To (not Present Continuous) when we have some evidence of what is about to happen.
E.g. Look at the dark clouds! It’s going to rain.
E.g. This girl is very pale; she’s going to faint!
KEY WORDS:
At…(7:00P.M.)
With the verbs: START / FINISH / OPEN / CLOSE / DEPART / ARRIVE
After these time expressions: WHEN / UNTIL / BEFORE / AFTER / AS SOON AS
KEY WORDS:
Tonight
Tomorrow
KEY WORDS:
I’m sure
I think / I hope / 
I imagine
Maybe / Perhaps / It’s possible that…
KEY WORDS:
Next summer / winter etc.
Look!

























































Wednesday, August 17, 2016

English - French Vocabulary Issues: FALSE FRIENDS


False Friends are pairs of words (in different languages) that bear a resemblance to each other, but carry different meanings. They can cause embarrassing misunderstandings and, in extreme cases, even communication breakdown.

Here’s the list I’ve prepared for you. The words highlighted in pink are the most common mistakes my students make. I hope it helps!

As usual, you can get the printable version (with the ANSWER KEY) by clicking HERE.

Cheers,
Kasia.

ENGLISH WORD
FRENCH TRANSLATION
SIMILAR FRENCH WORD
ENGLISH TRANSLATION
Actually
En fait
Actuellement
At present / Currently
Caution
Prudence (f)
Caution (f)
Guarantee / Deposit / Bail
(to) Charge
Faire payer
Charger (camion ; voiture; fusil ; camera)
*Load (truck; car ; gun ; camera)
*Charge (battery)
Comprehensive
Complet /Total /Poyvalent
Compréhensif
Tolerant / Understanding / Sympathetic
(to) Deceive
Tromper
Décevoir
Disappoint
Deception
Tromperie (f)
Déception
Disappointment
Delay
Retard
Délai
Time limit / Wait
Engaged
Occupé / Fiancé
Engagé
Commited / Involved
Eventually
Finalement
Eventuellement
Possibly
(to be) Fortunate
Avoir de la chance
Fortuné
Rich / Wealthy
Gentle
Doux
Gentil
Nice / Kind
Grip
Prise (f) / Poignée (f)
Grippe
Flu
Habit
Habitude (f)
Habit (m)
Outfit
Hazard
Danger
Hasard
Luck / Coincidence
Indulge
Se faire plaisir
Indulgence
Indulgence / mais aussi Leniency
Lecture
Conférence / Cours / Leçon / Morale
Lecture
Reading
Location
Emplacement / Endroit
Location
Renting / Rental / Hire
Medicine
Médicament
Médecin
Doctor
Mercy
Miséricorde (f)
Merci
Thank you
Petrol
Essence (f)
Pétrole (m)
Oil
Phrase
Expression (f)
Phrase
Sentence
Preservative
Conservateur (m)
Préservatif (m)
Condom
(to) Prevent
Empêcher
Prévenir
(to) Warn
(to) Regard
Considérer
Regarder
(to) Look at
(to) Resume
Reprendre
Résumer
(to) Sum up
Rude
Impoli
Rude
Rough (beard) / Hard (work)
Sensible
Raisonnable
Sensible
Sensitive
(to) Supply / Supplier
Fournir / Fournisseur (m)
Supplier
(to) Beg
Sympathetic
Compatissant
Sympathique
Nice / Friendly
Tissue
(Muscle tissue)
Mouchoir (m)
(Tissu)
Tissu
Fabric (Cloth)



PRACTICE:

Fill the gaps with correct forms of the words given below:

DECEIVE – DISPOSE – FORTUNATE – HABIT – ACTUALLY – DELAY – ENGAGED – EVENTUALLY – MERCY – SENSIBLE – SENSITIVE – SUIT – PROPER – PREVENT – TISSUE - NOTICE – INCONVENIENT

  1. She arrived at an extremely …………inconvenient…….moment.
  2. He ……………………………………..of the murder weapon.
  3. It’s a formal party, so you must wear a ……………………………….
  4. I don’t think we should show any ………………………….to murderers.
  5. I’m not Anna’s sister. ……………………………….., I’m her cousin.
  6. I have a terrible cold; have you got a ……………………..for me?
  7. What can we do to ……………………………………global warming?
  8. Be ………………………………..! You shouldn’t quit your job without any other options available.
  9. Peter is very ……………………………… He has won the lottery twice!
  10. Put these files in their …………………………place!
  11. I’m sorry for the ……………………………….; I got stuck in a traffic jam.
  12. My skin is very…………………………………; that’s why I avoid sunbathing.
  13. I always brush my teeth before breakfast; it’s a …………………………..
  14. Stop reminding me about the report! I’ll do it………………………………….
  15. If you want to quit, you need to give a two-month ………………………………..


Sunday, November 22, 2015

Past Simple vs. Present Perfect - Everything you need to know in 1 table!

How many of you get frustrated with Past Simple vs. Present Perfect revisions, discussions, tests...? Although Past Simple has always been this cool, logical, straight-forward past tense all of us know from our own mother tongues, Present Perfect seems to be its evil twin brother. Sometimes it's about the past, sometimes it's about the present; sometimes you need a specific context and sometimes you must use it and that's it - no questions asked, no answers given.

Today I've put this tricky tense (I've used 'I've put' - who can tell me why? ;)) in a table and hopefully you'll understand once and for all when you really need Past Simple and when you should go for Present Perfect.

You can get the printable version (with the answer key) by clicking HERE.

Past Simple
Present Perfect Simple
Construction:

I bought a car last week.

I didn’t buy a car last week.

Did you buy a car last week?
Construction:

I’ve bought a car this week.

I haven’t bought a car this week.

Have you bought a car this week?
Usage:

1. For actions that happened in the past. The time of the action is finished and important.
Ex: She didn’t eat anything yesterday morning.
2.Past states and habits.
Ex: I never woke up before 8.00 in those days. (habit)
Ex: I lived and worked in Portugal when I was younger. (state)
3.Actions that happened in the past one after another.
Ex: I came back home, ate dinner and went to sleep.
4. When we mention people who are no longer with us.
Ex: Princess Diana was the mother of William and Harry.
Usage:

1.For actions that are finished but the time of the action is not finished.
Ex: She hasn’t eaten anything this morning.
2.Actions that are finished but the time of the action is not important or not clear.
Ex: I’ve recently moved to London.
3.To give news; to tell people about new things that have happened.
Ex: A plane has crashed at Heathrow Airport.
4. For past actions with still visible effects.
Ex: Anna has broken her leg. (It’s still in plaster)
!5.For actions that started in the past but continue now.
Ex: I have loved my husband since we met in 1995.

! In this usage we normally we use non-progressive verbs in Present Perfect Simple and progressive ones in Present Perfect Continuous.

Examples of non-progressive verbs: love; like; know; be; want; seem; own; have; see; etc.

I haven’t seen Peter for ages. – Present Perfect Simple

I’ve been studying a lot recently. – Present Perfect Continuous.


Key words:
yesterday; last...(month, year, Monday); ....(2 years, a week)ago; for...(a week, a year); when…?
Key words:
this... (week, year, summer);
recently; lately; just; already; ever; never; yet; before
for ... (periods of time, ex: a week, a day, 5 hours, 5 years)
since... (particular moments in the past, ex: Monday, 2010, May, the party, I met you)



 Quiz Time! 
                                         

Present Perfect vs. Past Simple & Present Simple

Choose the correct option:

I have worked / worked / work in this company for 5 years now.

Where were you / have you been all day yesterday?

When have you got / did you get married?

I’ve already/yet done it.

I went/ have gone to Australia 3 times before.

Michael Jackson was/has been the biggest star of his generation.

My family lives/ has lived in France.

How long have you worked/ did you work/ do you work here?

You look awful! What happened/ has happened?

I didn’t look/ haven’t looked for a new job since I found/ have found this one.

We’ve been friends for/since a long time.

I didn’t see/ haven’t seen this film before.

She has just / still bought a new car.